Characters Exercises

The purpose of this exercise page is to help student writers practice and improve their writing skills. This will give an idea of what should be taken from the lesson page.

A. Character Building

Build a character with each example using the character skeleton. Use the example below to help you.

Example: A fourth-grade teacher
Name of Character:
Mr. Jameson

Age:
42

Personality:
Nice most of the time, but when a kid gets in trouble, knows how to give punishment.

The goal of the character and why it is important:
He wants to make learning about Science more interesting for students, so he makes a contest for the best Science project.

What the Character looks like (height, skin color, weight):
5’10”, lanky, wears glasses and has a mustache, pale skin, hazel eyes, wears sweaters all the time.

Where is the character from and living currently?
He is from Idaho and currently lives in Maine with his wife and two kids.

Anything else about the character that comes to mind:
He is a Science buff and loves to watch science-related documentaries.


1. A farmer

Name of Character:
Age:
Personality:
The goal of the character and why it is important:
What the Character looks like (height, skin color, weight):
Where is the character from and living currently?:
Anything else about the character that comes to mind:


2. A police officer

Name of Character:
Age:
Personality:
The goal of the character and why it is important:
What the Character looks like (height, skin color, weight):
Where is the character from and living currently?:
Anything else about the character that comes to mind:


3. A musician

Name of Character:
Age:
Personality:
The goal of the character and why it is important:
What the Character looks like (height, skin color, weight):
Where is the character from and living currently?:
Anything else about the character that comes to mind:


B. Definitions

Match each word with the definition:

1. Character Arc
2. Antagonist
3. Protagonist
4. Tritagonist
5. Inner Conflict
6. Outer Conflict
7. Conflict

A. The state of the character as the story unravels. It is the growth of a character.
B. The problem in the story.
C. The person, or persons that are against the main character.
D. The main character; the first or central figure in a story.
E. What goes on inside the character.
F. The third character of importance.
G. What goes on outside of the character.

C. Identify the Arc

Read each example and decide whether it represents a “good to bad” arc, “bad to good” arc, or a “constant” arc.

1. A poor kid makes an invention and becomes wealthy.

2. A successful weightlifter loses his last competition.

3. A bully is given a chance to change his ways, but in the end of the story, continues to treat people in a rude manner.